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EPA Awards Lockheed Martin for F-35 Program
PRNewswire-FirstCall
PALMDALE, Calif.

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co. in Palmdale has been recognized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for dramatically reducing the use of hazardous materials in the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program.

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co. is a business area of Lockheed Martin Corp. .

The plant received the EPA Region 9's 2003 Environmental Achievement Award for its F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Design for Environment (DfE) process. EPA officials presented the award on Earth Day, April 22, in San Francisco. The award recognizes "exceptional work and commitment to the environment."

The company initiated DfE to identify, eliminate and minimize the use of hazardous materials in the F-35 design, production and subsequent operations throughout the aircraft's life cycle. The goal of DfE is to integrate materials into the design that reduce environmental impact, minimize effects on worker health and safety, and lower the life-cycle costs of hazardous materials handling.

"All who are familiar with the F-35 program understand that it represents a new paradigm across the board," said Tom Burbage, executive vice president and general manager of the Lockheed Martin F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program. "We are as interested in being good citizens as we are in making good airplanes. In the case of the F-35, I'm happy to say that we're doing both, and I'm very proud of our Palmdale team for their dedication to doing the right thing for the environment."

The DfE process for the F-35 achieved major improvements over previous prototype aircraft, with a 75-percent reduction in hazardous materials used to support the aircraft system. For example, the F-35 will use chrome-free primer and sealants, water-based cleaners and will make extensive use of adhesive coating appliques instead of paint.

An Internet-based product data manager also was instituted to track, identify, locate and replace hazardous materials to control their use, storage and disposal.

The Los Angeles County Sanitation District nominated Lockheed Martin for the award.

Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 in conjunction with its principal industrial partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE SYSTEMS. Two separate but interchangeable engines are under development by Pratt & Whitney and General Electric. Among the aircraft F-35 will replace are the AV-8B Harrier, A-10, F-16, F/A-18 and United Kingdom's Harrier GR.7 and Sea Harrier.

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas, is a leader in the design, development, systems integration, production and support of advanced military aircraft and related technologies. Its customers include the military services of the United States and allied countries throughout the world. Products include the F-16, F/A-22, F-35 JSF, F-117, T-50, C-5, C-130, C-130J, P-3, S-3 and U-2.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin employs about 125,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture and integration of advanced technology systems, products and services. The corporation reported 2002 sales of $26.6 billion.

SOURCE: Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company

CONTACT: John Smith, +1-817-763-4084, or +1-817-312-5131, or
john.a1.smith@lmco.com , or John Kent, +1-817-763-3980, or +1-817-308-5567, or
john.r.kent@lmco.com , or Dianne Knippel, +1-661-572-4153, or +1-661-965-8381,
or dianne.m.knippel@lmco.com , all of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company